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Записи с темой: psychology (список заголовков)
16:50 

Lika_k
Искусствоед
Ты умрешь от усталости, не интересуясь ничем, кроме себя самого...

Кастанеда Карлос, Учение дона Хуана, 1968

@темы: 20, anthropology, english-american, mysticism, non-fiction, occult, psychology, religion, spirituality, к (rus)

20:58 

Lika_k
Искусствоед
I thought it curious and moving that Martin, a retardate, should have this great passion for Bach. Bach seemed so intellectual - and Martin was a simpleton. What I did not realise, until I started bringing in cassettes of the cantatas, and once of the Magnificat, when I visited, was that for all his intellectual limitations Martin's musical intelligence was fully up to appreciating much of the technical complexity of Bach; but, more than this - that it wasn't a question of intelligence at all. Bach lived for him, and he lived in Bach.
Martin did, indeed, have 'freak' musical abilities - but they were only freak - like if removed from their right and natural context.
What was central to Martin, as it had been central for his father, and what had been intimately shared between them, was always the spirit of music, especially religious music, and of the voice as the divine instrument made and ordained to sing, to raise itself in jubilation and praise.

Oliver Sacks, The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales, 1985

@темы: baroque, music, psychology, s, sacks, oliver

20:57 

Lika_k
Искусствоед
At such times - in the oratorios and passions most of all, but also in the humbler church choirs and chorales - as he soared up into the music Martin forgot that he was 'retarded', forgot all the sadness and badness of his life, sensed a great spaciousness enfold him, felt himself both a true man and a true child of God.

Oliver Sacks, The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales, 1985

@темы: 20, english: anglo-american, music, psychology, s, sacks, oliver

20:57 

Lika_k
Искусствоед
Rebecca made clear, by concrete illustrations, by her own self, the two wholly different, wholly separate, forms of thought and mind, 'paradigmatic' and 'narrative' (in Bruner's terminology). And though equally natural and native to the expanding human mind, the narrative comes first, has spiritual priority.
Very young children love and demand stories, and can understand complex matters presented as stories, when their powers of comprehending general concepts, paradigms, are almost non-existent. It is this narrative or symbolic power which gives a sense of the world - a concrete reality in the imaginative form of symbol and story - when abstract thought can provide nothing at all. A child follows the Bible before he follows Euclid. Not because the Bible is simpler (the reverse might be said), but because it is cast in a symbolic and narrative mode.

Oliver Sacks, The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales, 1985

@темы: psychology, english: anglo-american, 20, s, sacks, oliver

20:57 

Lika_k
Искусствоед
By a sort of inversion, or subversion, of the natural order of things, concreteness is often seen by neurologists as a wretched thing, beneath consideration, incoherent, regressed. Thus for Kurt Goldstein, the greatest systematiser of his generation, the mind, man's glory, lies wholly in the abstract and categorical, and the effect of brain damage, any and all brain damage, is to cast him out from this high realm into the almost subhuman swamplands of the concrete. If a man loses the 'abstract-categorical attitude' (Goldstein), or 'prepositional thought' (Hughlings Jackson), what remains is subhuman, of no moment or interest.

I call this an inversion because the concrete is elemental-it is what makes reality 'real', alive personal and meaningful. All of this is lost if the concrete is lost - as we saw in the case of the “almost-Martian Dr P., 'the man who mistook his wife for a hat', who fell (in an un-Goldsteinian way) from the concrete to the abstract.
Much easier to comprehend, and altogether more natural, is the idea of the preservation of the concrete in brain damage-not regression to it, but preservation of it, so that the essential personality and identity and humanity, the being of the hurt creature, is preserved.

Oliver Sacks, The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales, 1985

@темы: sacks, oliver, s, psychology, english: anglo-american, 20

20:57 

Lika_k
Искусствоед
What is this quality of mind, this disposition, which characterises the simple, and gives them their poignant innocence, transparency, completeness and dignity-a quality so distinctive we must speak of the 'world' of the simple (as we speak of the 'world' of the child or the savage)?

If we are to use a single word here, it would have to be 'con-creteness'-their world is vivid, intense, detailed, yet simple, precisely because it is concrete: neither complicated, diluted, nor unified, by abstraction.

Oliver Sacks, The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales, 1985

@темы: sacks, oliver, s, psychology, english: anglo-american, 20

20:56 

Lika_k
Искусствоед
It has to do with qualities of mind which are preserved, even enhanced, so that, though 'mentally defective' in some ways, they may be mentally interesting, even mentally complete, in others. Qualities of mind other than the conceptual-this is what we may explore with peculiar clarity in the simple mind

Oliver Sacks, The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales, 1985

@темы: sacks, oliver, s, psychology, english: anglo-american, 20

20:56 

Lika_k
Искусствоед
Such patterns of meaning would indeed transcend purely formal or computational programmes or patterns, and allow the essentially personal quality which is inherent in reminiscence, inherent in all mnesis, gnosis, and praxis. And if we ask what form, what organisation, such patterns could have, the answer springs immediately (and, as it were, inevitably) to mind. Personal patterns, patterns for the individual, would have to take the form of scripts or scores-as abstract patterns, patterns for a computer, must take the form of schemata or programmes. Thus, above the level of cerebral programmes, we must conceive a level of cerebral scripts and scores

Oliver Sacks, The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales, 1985

@темы: 20, english: anglo-american, psychology, s, sacks, oliver

20:56 

Lika_k
Искусствоед
Stimulate a point in the cortex of such a patient, and there convulsively unrolls a Proustian evocation or reminiscence

Oliver Sacks, The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales, 1985

@темы: 20, english: anglo-american, memoria, p, proust, marcel, psychology, s, sacks, oliver

20:56 

Lika_k
Искусствоед
As Mrs O'C. and Mrs O'M. suffered from 'reminiscence', a convulsive upsurge of melodies and scenes-a sort of hyper-mnesis and hyper-gnosis-our amnesic-agnosic patients have lost (or are losing) their inner melodies and scenes. Both alike testify to the essentially 'melodic' and 'scenic' nature of inner life, the 'Proustian' nature of memory and mind.

Oliver Sacks, The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales, 1985

@темы: s, psychology, proust, marcel, p, music, memoria, english-american, 20, sacks, oliver

20:55 

Lika_k
Искусствоед
Dostoievski had 'psychical seizures', or 'elaborate mental states' at the onset of seizures, and once said of these:
You all, healthy people, can't imagine the happiness which we epileptics feel during the second before our fit… I don't know if this felicity lasts for seconds, hours or months, but believe me, I would not exchange it for all the joys that life may bring. (T. Alajouanine, 1963)

Oliver Sacks, The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales, 1985

@темы: 20, citatus, english: anglo-american, psychology, s, sacks, oliver, достоевский, ф. м

20:55 

Lika_k
Искусствоед
The month after I saw Mrs O'M. there was an article in the New York Times entitled 'Did Shostakovich Have a Secret?' The 'secret' of Shostakovich, it was suggested-by a Chinese neurologist, Dr Dajue Wang-was the presence of a metallic splinter, a mobile shell-fragment, in his brain, in the temporal horn of the left ventricle. Shostakovich was very reluctant, apparently, to have this removed:
Since the fragment had been there, he said, each time he leaned his head to one side he could hear music. His head was filled with melodies-different each time-which he then made use of when composing.
X-rays allegedly showed the fragment moving around when Shostakovich moved his head, pressing against his 'musical' temporal lobe, when he tilted, producing an infinity of melodies which his genius could use. Dr R.A. Henson, editor of Music and the Brain (1977), expressed deep but not absolute scepticism: 'I would hesitate to affirm that it could not happen.

Oliver Sacks, The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales, 1985

@темы: sacks, oliver, s, psychology, music, english: anglo-american, 20

20:54 

Lika_k
Искусствоед
And what Mrs O'C. told me, her obvious nostalgia, put me in mind of a poignant story of H.G. Wells, 'The Door in the Wall'. I told her the story. 'That's it,' she said. 'That captures the mood, the feeling, entirely. But my door is real, as my wall was real. My door leads to the lost and forgotten past.

Oliver Sacks, The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales, 1985

@темы: 20, english-british, english: anglo-american, libri, literature, psychology, s, sacks, oliver

20:54 

Lika_k
Искусствоед
For it never occurs to us at first that a vision might be 'medical'; and if an organic basis is suspected or found, this may be felt to 'devalue' the vision (though, of course, it does not-values, valuations, have nothing to do with etiology

Oliver Sacks, The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales, 1985

@темы: 20, english: anglo-american, psychology, s, sacks, oliver

20:54 

Lika_k
Искусствоед
How, say, is a dream intelligible in terms of function?
We have always two universes of discourse-call them 'physical' and 'phenomenal', or what you will-one dealing with questions of quantitative and formal structure, the other with those qualities that constitute a 'world'. All of us have our own, distinctive mental worlds, our own inner journeyings and landscapes, and these, for most of us, require no clear neurological 'correlate'.

Oliver Sacks, The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales, 1985

@темы: english: anglo-american, 20, psychology, s, sacks, oliver

20:53 

Lika_k
Искусствоед
the powers of survival, of the will to survive, and to survive as a unique inalienable individual, are, absolutely, the strongest in our being: stronger than any impulses, stronger than disease. Health, health militant, is usually the victor.

Oliver Sacks, The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales, 1985

@темы: 20, english: anglo-american, psychology, s, sacks, oliver

20:53 

Lika_k
Искусствоед
The presence of others, other people, excite and rattle him, force him into an endless, frenzied, social chatter, a veritable delirium of identity-making and -seeking; the presence of plants, a quiet garden, the non-human order, making no social or human demands upon him, allow this identity-delirium to relax, to subside; and by their quiet, non-human self-sufficiency and completeness allow him a rare quietness and self-sufficiency of his own, by offering (beneath, or beyond, all merely human identities and relations) a deep wordless communion with Nature itself, and with this the restored sense of being in the world, being real.

Oliver Sacks, The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales, 1985

@темы: 20, english: anglo-american, psychology, s, sacks, oliver

20:53 

Lika_k
Искусствоед
For it is not memory which is the final, 'existential' casualty here (although his memory is wholly devastated); it is not memory only which has been so altered in him, but some ultimate capacity for feeling which is gone; and this is the sense in which he is 'de-souled'.

Oliver Sacks, The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales, 1985

@темы: 20, english: anglo-american, memoria, psychology, s, sacks, oliver

20:52 

Lika_k
Искусствоед
Nothing in William's tone or manner-nothing in his exuberant, but unvarying and indifferent, style of monologue-had prepared me for the possibility of. . . reality. William spoke of his brother, who was real, in precisely the same tone, or lack of tone, in which he spoke of the unreal-and now, suddenly, out of the phantoms, a real figure appeared! Further, he did not treat his younger brother as 'real'-did not display any real emotion, was not in the least oriented or delivered from his delirium- but, on the contrary, instantly treated his brother as unreal, effacing him, losing him, in a further whirl of delirium - utterly different from the rare but profoundly moving times when Jimmie G. (see Chapter Two) met his brother, and while with him was unlost

Oliver Sacks, The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales, 1985

@темы: 20, english: anglo-american, psychology, s, sacks, oliver

20:52 

Lika_k
Искусствоед
Complementary to any purely medicinal, or medical, approach there must also be an 'existential' approach: in particular, a sensitive understanding of action, art and play as being in essence healthy and free, and thus antagonistic to crude drives and impulsions, to 'the blind force of the subcortex' from which these patients suffer.

Oliver Sacks, The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales, 1985

@темы: 20, english: anglo-american, psychology, s, sacks, oliver

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